Author: Equinox Paranormal

Faces on Turned Off Television ScreensOf the m…

Faces on Turned Off Television Screens

Of the many forms of paranormal photography, faces
sometimes found in photographs of turned off television screens seems to be the
most unusual. In spirit photography, the presence of an “extra” or apparition
in the photographic frame is consistent with the concept that we who are still
in the flesh are providing sufficient energy (perhaps ectoplasm) with which the
entity can become visible to the sensitive film or digital circuitry. In
Photographic ITC, faces and other features that can sometimes be found in the
optical noise of photographs is consistent with principles thought to be
involved in Video ITC and EVP. But the presence of a face on a television
screen, as if it were a photograph cut out and glued to the screen to be
photographed, does not agree with any of the hypotheses presented thus far.

Click here to continue
reading this article by the Association TransCommunication.

6 Unusual Objects From the Macabre History of …

6 Unusual Objects From the Macabre History of Magic:

Maybe it’s the black background, but the feathery
ring above has an eerie vibe to it. A ghirlanda—Italian for garland—like
this one would have smelled “extremely
nasty
,” at least at first, according to one report. Woven among the
feathers, there would be bone, hair, even old teeth, and it had
a sinister purpose
. Hidden in a person’s bed, it was supposed to cause them
to fall ill and die. “Everyone believed I had bought the ghirlanda in
order to get rid of my husband!” wrote an English historian living in Italy, in
a letter to a friend who’d asked her to procure one—purely for research. (Or so
the friend said.)

The ghirlanda above is just one of the
objects associated with magic and witchcraft featured in a new exhibit, called Spellbound,
at the University of Oxford’s Ashmolean
Museum
, which is dedicated to art and archaeology. The aim, according to
the museum, is to “show how, even in this skeptical age, we still use magical
thinking.” Astrology is such a booming trend right now that almost seems
self-evident. The magic of the past, though, could be a bit more gruesome. 

Continue
reading at Atlas Obscura.

New Research Shows that Time Travel is Mathema…

New Research Shows that Time Travel is Mathematically Possible:

Even before the Einstein theorized that the time is relative and flexible, humanity had already been imagining the possibility of time travel. In fact, science fiction is filled with time travelers. Some use metahuman abilities to do so, but most rely on a device generally known as a time machine.

Now, two physicists think that it’s time to bring the time machine into the real world — sort of.

Read more from The Space Academy. 

In 1952, the Flatwoods Monster Terrified 6 Kid…

In 1952, the Flatwoods Monster Terrified 6 Kids, a Mom, a Dog—and the Nation:

The Flatwoods Monster has not hissed at boys in the
little village of Flatwoods, West Virginia, since Sept. 12, 1952.

People grin about it now—and take Monster souvenir money,
from hundreds of Monster tourists every week. But it scared people plenty back
then, including the eyewitnesses: six boys aged 10 to 17, a dog and a Mom.

“One of the boys peed his pants,” said John Gibson, a
high-school freshman at the time, who knew them all. “Their dog (Rickie) ran
with his tail between his legs.”

The encounter made the local and national news, scaring a
wider swath of people. Then it prompted a U.S. Air Force UFO inquiry, part of
an initiative called Project Blue
Book
 that dispatched a handful of investigators around the country
to look into such claims.

It also became a local legend, a Southern spook story
that defined the tiny village of less than 300 people for more than six
decades. To this day, tourists come out of their way to Flatwoods—secluded in
the low, timbered Appalachian hills of central West Virginia—to visit its
monster museum and buy Green Monster tchotchkes and T-shirts. 

Visit
History Stories for the full article.

Ghosts of the Irish Famine immigrants haunt Mo…

Ghosts of the Irish Famine immigrants haunt Montreal’s streets:

At the height of the Irish famine in 1847, thousands of
immigrants arrived aboard coffin ships, seeking refuge at the Port of
Montreal.  Six thousand of those died of typhus and were buried in mass
graves and nearly forgotten.

Of those that survived, many settled in nearby
Griffintown, a shanty town on the banks of the Lachine Canal, where many found
work on the docks or in the associated industries that grew up around the
canal. When St. Ann’s Church was built in 1854, 1,300 Irish families were
settled in Griffintown and within a half-century, the community numbered
60,000, in addition to the Irish, many Italian and Ukrainian immigrants as well
as working-class Quebecois. 

In 1963, the area was re-zoned as “Industrial” and a
project to build an expressway through the middle of the neighborhood hastened
its demise. By 1970 the population of Griffintown was under 1000.

St. Ann’s Church was demolished and the community was
littered with abandoned factories, parking lots and rubble. Today the
neighborhood is populated with upscale condominiums and Griffintown has receded
into distant memory.

For
the full article, visit Irish Central.

What’s that making a noise at night in Gedling…

What’s that making a noise at night in Gedling Woods?:

Gedling Woods were originally part of the ancient
Sherwood Forest, home to Robin Hood. However, today Gedling Woods is but a
fraction of its original size, and is a nature reserve close to Shearing Hill.

There is full public access to Gedling Woods and it is a
very popular destination for dog walkers and hikers.

Most people have no idea of the many hauntings associated
with it.

There have been many reported cases of paranormal
activity over the centuries, including a ghostly nun and also of a White Lady –
both of which have been seen to glide along the many tracks which criss-cross
the woodland.

Visit
the Gedling Eye for the full article.

Paisley Abbey’s ‘Alien’ Gargoyle

Paisley Abbey’s ‘Alien’ Gargoyle:

Paisley Abbey
was first built in the 12th century. The medieval site is steeped in
history—it’s even said Sir William Wallace was educated here. But it’s the
abbey’s more recent architectural details that are responsible for drawing
sci-fi fans to the site. 

In 1991, the abbey underwent some necessary restoration
work. Twelve of its 13 gargoyles were so badly ruined from water damage they
had to be removed. The work was carried out by an Edinburgh-based stone masonry
company, which replaced the carvings with newer models. 

For more, visit Atlas
Obscura.

UFOs and Presidents: the Top 5 Encounters

UFOs and Presidents: the Top 5 Encounters:

Visit
Area51.org to read the experiences of Harry Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, John F.
Kennedy, Richard Nixon, and Jimmy Carter.

Ovnipuerto Cachi, an Extraterrestrial Landing …

Ovnipuerto Cachi, an Extraterrestrial Landing Pad:

Werner Jaisli
arrived in Cachi in 2008 with one purpose in mind: to create a landing space
for the extraterrestrials with whom he was in telepathic communication. He
obtained a field on the outskirts of town and set to work building a beacon
that could guide the aliens to Earth.

Supposedly, interplanetary beings contacted Jaisli one
night in November 2008. While illuminated by the light of a UFO’s beam, he
received a telepathic message from the aircraft’s captain. “If you build it, we
will go,” it purportedly said, sounding like a character from an otherworldly
version of Field of Dreams.

For the full article,
visit Atlas Obscura.

The strange world of felt presences

The strange world of felt presences:

Understanding more about how and why felt presences occur has the potential to tell us many things about ourselves: how we react under intense mental or physical stress, how we deal with danger and threat, and how we recognize the shape and position of our own body. But one thing it also may do is shed light on other unusual experiences that are hard to understand.