Category: ghosts

Ghost Expedition Jefferson County, Shepherdstown WV: Entler…

Ghost Expedition Jefferson County, Shepherdstown WV: Entler Hotel/Historic Shepherdstown

Shepherdstown is considered the “oldest city in West Virginia” with a history predating the French-Indian War.  

The town was chartered in 1762 by the royal Virginia governor as Mecklenberg, named for Charlotte of Mecklenberg-Strelitz, wife of King George III. The name of Charlottesville had already been granted to another town in the colony. Thomas Shepherd was named the trustee of the town of 222 acres which had been granted to him in 1734.  Eventually the town would be named for him in 1798

Shepherdstown is also known by the nickname of “The Old Unterrified” due to its contributions to the nation’s wars. Shepherdstown was said to have provided more soldiers in the American Revolutionary War than any other town of its size in Virginia. In response to General George Washington’s call for volunteers in 1775, the Mecklenberg company of 97 men commanded by Capt Hugh Stephenson made the famous “Beeline March“ from Morgan Spring to Cambridge Massachusetts, ranging 600 miles in 24 days

According to the Shepherdstown’s Register in 1850, the town ”sent nearly three complete companies to the field“ in the War of 1812 and contributed to ranks of several other companies.  Troops from Shepherdstown, led by Lieutenant Bennett Riley, repulsed the British attack at the Battle of Plattsburgh.  During the capture of Fort George, a Shepherdstown resident, Michael Durnhoeffer, leapt upon the wall of the fort amidst a barrage of artillery fire, and yelled out, “HURRAH FOR OLD SHEPHERDSTOWN”

During the Mexican War, Colonel John Francis Hamtramck led the 1st Virginia Volunteer Regiment.  He was mayor of Shepherdstown from 1850 to 1854, and from 1853 to 1858 served on the Jefferson County Court. He died at his home in Shepherdstown in 1858.  The Hamtramck Guard (The Shepherdstown Light Infantry) was sent to Harpers Ferry to quell John Brown’s raid on the federal armory in 1859.  In the Civil War, this group became Company B, 2nd Virginia Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia

Battles took place all around Shepherdstown throughout the Civil War due to its proximity to Pack Horse Ford, a crossing of the Potomac River.  After the Battle of Antietam in 1862, Shepherdstown became a giant makeshift hospital for thousands of confederate wounded  

A Confederate rear guard, led by General William Pendleton, repulsed Union attacks on forces withdrawing from Sharpsburg in the Battle of Shepherdstown.  The 118th Pennsylvania, known as the Philadelphia Corn Exchange Regiment, suffered heavy losses against battle-hardened confederates, amounting to 269 casualties from 737 men

The properties making up the Entler Hotel were built in 1786 by Philip Adam Entler Jr and expanded in 1790 by Daniel Bedinger. The hotel returned to Entler family ownership in 1824 and was managed for many years by Daniel Entler and his wife Margaret, and later by their oldest son son Jacob.  

The Entler Hotel was a societal hub for Shepherdstown. However, the hotel suffered losses from caring for confederate wounded in the Civil War. After a devastating fire in 1912 which destroyed much of downtown German street, Entler family heirs sold the property, which after renovations opened as the Rumsey Hotel

In 1921, the property was acquired by Shepherd University and renamed Rumsey Hall where it served as a student dormitory, faculty housing and later as storage.  In 1973 the hotel was added to the National Register of Historic Places.  In 1978, the city acquired the building and renovations were begun by Historic Shepherdstown in 1979.  The property reopened as Historic Shepherdstown and Museum in 1983

The Entler Hotel is thought to be haunted by the ghost of Peyton Bull Smith.  He was killed in a duel by his business partner Joseph Holmes on Tuesday, Nov 3, 1809 at daybreak. Smith was carried to the hotel where he died.  Noises, moans, and footsteps haunt the hotel.  Other folklore legends include a gambler shot himself after losing cattle money and the daughter of the hotel manager died in the 1910 fire within the hotel

Though less widely known, haunted activity in the form of imitative noises is also said to occur in the vicinity of the Schomaker & Co piano on the first floor.  The piano was originally owned by John Henry Schau and his wife Elizabeth Catherine Cookus-Schau (she was also called “Aunt Betsy”). The couple resided on German Street in Shepherdstown.

The paranormal television show Ghosts of Shepherdstown featured a series of haunted locations that were loosely clustered around the Town Run, a tributary of the Potomac river that runs through the center of the town

The ghost expedition sought “drop-in” communications in connection with the history and legacies of the Shepherdstown

REFERENCES:

Civil War Trust. An Interview with Nicholas Redding. American Battlefield Trust

Dandridge, D. (1910).  Historic Shepherdstown. The Michie Company Printers, Charlottesville, Virginia

Digital Exhibit: Schomacker & Co. Piano. (2016). Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

John Francis Hamtramck. (2018). Digital Exhibit. Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Langmyer, M. (2016). The Entler Hotel – Restoration. Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Langmyer, M. (2016).  Shepherdstown and the American Civil War.  Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Langmyer, M. (2016). The Battle of Shepherdstown.  Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Lehman, M.C. (2016). The Entler Hotel – History. Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

McGee, T. (1972, Oct 6). National Register of Historic Places Nomination: Rumsey Hall (Entler Hotel). National Park Service

McGee, T. (1973, Apr 2). National Register of Historic Places Nomination: Shepherdstown Historic District. National Park Service

Norris, D.A. (2018). Battle of Shepherdstown. American Battlefield Trust

Our Own Ghost of Shepherdstown. (2016). Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Price, J.C. and Woods, D.C (2016). The Entler Hotel – A Chronology. Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Rogers, J.E. (2013, Jan 13). Daniel Entler (b 1785 – d1866) and Family. Memorial ID 103540248. Find A Grave

Rumsey Hall (Shepherdstown, West Virginia). (2018, Apr 27). Wikipedia

Shepherdstown: Battle of Boteler’s Ford. (2018). American Battlefield Trust

Shepherdstown Gets Over Fire. (1912, Nov 16). The Daily News, Frederick, MD. Newspapers.com

SHEPHERDSTOWN, WV “SEMI-QUINCENTENNIAL” 250TH ANNIVERSARY AND CELEBRATION. (2012). Corporation of Shepherdstown WV

Shepherdstown, West Virginia. (2018). Wikipedia

Stoner-Reed, P. (1987, Sep 26), National Register of Historic Places Nomination: Shepherdstown Historic District (Boundary Increase). National Park Service

Thomas, J.B. (2018). War of 1812. Digital Exhibit. Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

IMAGES:

Acroterian. (2008, Nov 29). Entler Hotel (Rumsey Hall), Shepherdstown, West Virginia. Wikipedia

Highsmith, C. M., photographer. (2015). The historic Entler Hotel, now the city visitors’ center, in Shepherdstown, West Virginia. Shepherdstown United States West Virginia, 2015. -04-29.  Library of Congress

Rumsey Hall, looking north or front view. (c 1925). Rumsey Hall Gallery. Shepherd University

Rumsey Hall as the Entler Hotel, looking northwest up German Street. (c 1880). Rumsey Hall Gallery. Shepherd University

Shepherdstown during the Civil War.  Historic Shepherdstown archives. Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Waud, A.R. (1862, Oct 11). Sketch of the Philadephia Corn Exchange Regiment Fording the Potomac Near Shepherdstown. Harper’s Weekly. p. 652. 

Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Boteler’s Ford, Potomac River near Shepherdstown. Point at which Confederate Army crossed after battle of Antietam

(c 1861-1865).   Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Ruins of bridge, across Potomac River at Shepherdstown.  (c 1861-1865).  

Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Rumsey Hall as the Entler Hotel after the fire, looking west up German Street. (1912, Nov). Rumsey Hall Gallery. Shepherd University

The Entler Hotel when the Town bought in 1979. (1979). Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Meet Resurrection Mary, the ghost of Archer Av…

Meet Resurrection Mary, the ghost of Archer Avenue:

equinoxparanormal:

Just southwest of Chicago, on Archer Avenue in Justice,
Illinois, across the street from Resurrection Cemetery, is a bar called Chet’s
Melody Lounge. Chet’s is a classic roadside tavern, with a pool table, a
jukebox, a popcorn machine, and a large clientele of bikers. But Chet’s has an
unusual tradition: every Sunday, the staff leaves a Bloody Mary at the end of
the bar for a ghost. The ghost’s name is Resurrection Mary, and she has haunted
this stretch of Archer since the 1930s, when she picked up young men dancing to
the big bands at the Oh Henry Ballroom. 

Click
here to continue reading this article by the Chicago Reader.

Meet Resurrection Mary, the ghost of Archer Av…

Meet Resurrection Mary, the ghost of Archer Avenue:

Just southwest of Chicago, on Archer Avenue in Justice,
Illinois, across the street from Resurrection Cemetery, is a bar called Chet’s
Melody Lounge. Chet’s is a classic roadside tavern, with a pool table, a
jukebox, a popcorn machine, and a large clientele of bikers. But Chet’s has an
unusual tradition: every Sunday, the staff leaves a Bloody Mary at the end of
the bar for a ghost. The ghost’s name is Resurrection Mary, and she has haunted
this stretch of Archer since the 1930s, when she picked up young men dancing to
the big bands at the Oh Henry Ballroom. 

Click
here to continue reading this article by the Chicago Reader.

Ghost Monk Spotted at Tintern Abbey in Wales |…

Ghost Monk Spotted at Tintern Abbey in Wales | Mysterious Universe: undefined

Want Cheap Rent in Tokyo? Get a Haunted Apartm…

Want Cheap Rent in Tokyo? Get a Haunted Apartment | Mysterious Universe: undefined

Blackbeard’s Ghost

Blackbeard’s Ghost:

On Ocracoke Island is a small channel of water known as Teach’s Hole. This inlet is reported to be the spot where the pirate Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard, preferred to anchor his ship. It’s also said to be where he met his end, and some say his ghost haunts the spot to this day.

Blackbeard roamed the Atlantic from around 1716 until 1718, robbing ships from the West Indies to the Carolinas. He had a reputation for unbridled ferocity. When Blackbeard went into battle, he strapped multiple pistols and multiple cutlasses to his body. Most frightening of all, he wove fuses into his long, black beard and set them on fire just before he stepped on to the captured ship. This towering figure, armed to the teeth, sporting a sparking, flaming beard must have been absolutely terrifying. Ships’ captains would surrender without a shot being fired.

Delta Queen: The Ghost of “Ma” Greene

The Delta Queen, a paddle steamboat, was assembled at
Banner Island Shipyard in Stockton, California in May of 1927. She was one of
the most luxurious American steamboats ever built at a cost of one million
dollars. 

Mary Becker Greene fondly known as “Ma” was once the owner and co-captain of
the Delta Queen. It is she who haunts the boat to this day. She was the first
female licensed riverboat captain along the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. 

While alive, Ma maintained a family atmosphere on the boat—she was a strong
supporter of temperance and did not allow liquor to be served on the Delta Queen. 

In April of 1949 after helping her son dock the Delta
Queen at her homeport on the Ohio River in Cincinnati, Ma retired to her cabin
where she passed away at the age of 79. 

After her death a saloon was established on board the
Delta Queen but shortly after the first drink was served a barge crashed into
the Delta Queen. When the crew was finally able to untangle the mess they were
amazed to discover the name of the barge was the Captain Mary B. 

So it appeared a barge carrying Ma’s name had managed to stop the one thing she
never wanted on board the Delta Queen–liquor. After this incident Ma’s ghost
started to appear on the Queen.

Click
here to read the entire article by Seeks Ghosts.

hauntspots: This video is being shared for th…

hauntspots:

This video is being shared for the purpose of inciting a debate and discussion.
For Haunt Spots we like to stay middle of the road because we love talking about spirits from both sides of the table in our podcast. Our blog is very ghost positive , so hearing a story of a beliver gone skeptic might be interesting to talk about.
Comment your thoughts below! Keep it spooky!

theladyinthegraveyard:                       …

theladyinthegraveyard:

                                               POVEGLIA

It
is considered one of the most bewitched places in the world.

Poveglia
is located between Venenzia and the beach in front of Malamocco on the Orfano
canal. Its first inhabitants date back to 421 A.C. At that time the island was
a refuge for the populations of the present Trieste and Padua who sought
shelter from the barbarian invasions.The
period of peace in the Venetian lagoon is interrupted with the outbreak of the
Chioggia war of 1379. The year in which Venice was attacked by the Genoese
fleet and the inhabitants of Poveglia were moved and therefore the island
remained uninhabited for many years.In
1645, octagonal fortifications were erected by the Venetian government to
protect the entrances to the lagoon. In 1776, Poveglia became a main point for
the control of every single ship that entered the lagoon.Venice
was one of the cities most affected by the plague epidemic that hit the Italian
peninsula and in 1700 just because of the outbreak of the epidemic, the island
was transformed into a hospital or rather as an open-air cemetery where people
were confined and then go to die.The
island is 72,000 square meters and here people were still brought conscious and
left there to die. The bodies rotted in the streets and the atmosphere was of
pain and anguish. Every day new infected animals were brought to the island,
and bodies were burned or buried in mass graves. Often it was not even made a subdivision
between terminally ill and infected in the early stages.In
the subsoil of the island there are whole layers of corpses. In
1922 the buildings of the island were rebuilt to accommodate an old people’s
home according to official sources, but in reality it was a psychiatric
hospital where mental patients were treated as being unsuitable for normal
hospitalization.

It
was also said that experiments were carried out on these people because being
mentally incapable they could be exploited or mistreated. In those years the
patients were subjected to “treatments” that today are considered
real torture: electroshock, baths in freezing water, lobotomies. many sufferers
said they saw strange shadows wandering in and out of the structure, though
obviously from the medical staff they were not believed. From
the second half of the 90s, the building was dismantled and the fate of the
health director was very macabre. The story says that he was tormented by the
island spirits until he went crazy and committed suicide from the island’s bell
tower. The legend says that a nurse who was nearby and who witnessed that crazy
gesture said that in reality the man did not die at the time of impact on the
ground but was suffocated by a strange fog after the fall. Today
Poveglia is closed to tourists and uninhabited, a valid permit is required to
access and visit it.

Image: The Isle of Poveglia. ( picture is not mine, credit to owner) 

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