Category: haunting

Ghost Expedition Montgomery County, Silver Spring Maryland:…

Ghost Expedition Montgomery County, Silver Spring Maryland: Burnt Mills West Special Park/Robert B Morse Water Filtration Plant

The Burnt Mills area in Silver Spring, Maryland takes it name from a mill that was said to have burned down there sometime before 1788.  From an antique copper stencil, veteran local journalist J. Harry Shannon (aka “The Rambler”) suggested in 1916 the burnt mill may have been known as “Glen Cairn Mills Family Flour

Milling operations in Burnt Mills date to 1745 when then area was patented as the Mill Seat.  The area’s terrain and rapid waterfalls enabled the operations of a series of grist, saw and flour mills.  

The earliest records of a flour mill at Burnt Mills date to 1803 when the property known as “Beall’s Industry” was sold by Walter Beall to Peter Kemp and James William Perry  

Nathan Lufborough acquired the flour mill and land, described in an 1823 deed as “one hundred acres more or less”.  He had intended to sell the mill in 1847 but he died before the sale could be completed, leaving the property to his heirs 

The flour mill at Burnt Mills was owned by James L. Bond from 1858 to 1886.  Bond sold the property to his sons-in law.  The last owner was Dr. George W. Bready who acquired the flour mill and land in 1906

In 1913, The Rambler rendered the following portrait of the old flour mill in the Sunday Star

The shingle roof of the mill is green, dark and old, with moss, but  nearly everything else about the mill – the miller, of course, included –  is whitened by the flour and meal ground there, and which has been grinding there so long that no man’s memory runneth to the contrary  

Near the mill is the miller’s house, bowered in the shade of numerous  close-growing trees and the home of Dr. William T. Brown, surrounded by  shrubbery, orchard and vineyard

The mill produced three grades of flour and stone-ground corn mill. The technology of the mill improved over time. A roller mill replaced mill stones around 1895. A turbine replaced the wheel in 1911 

In 1922 the mill was sold to the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) and was subsequently demolished in 1928.  After the mill had closed, it was briefly used by the Boy Scouts as a meeting hall

In 1879, Burnt Mills (Four Corners) was a farm community with a population of 125 persons.  In 1934, the Robert E. Lattimer Land Company developed the area as a community of country estates known as Burnt Mills Hills.  The development preserved the area’s topography of rolling hills and streams and farm lanes

WSSC began construction of a water filtration facility in 1930.  The plant featured a “state of art” design, by WSSC Chief Engineer Robert B. Morse, for rapid sand removal and water treatment.  The plant had two filter assemblies, two pumping stations and a new concrete dam.  Pumping stations were designed in the Georgian Revival style to give the appearance of large colonial houses rather than a public utility

  • The low-lift pumping station moved cleaned (sediment free-water) to filter assemblies where lime and ammonia were added
  • The filter assemblies featured circular rings that were used for each stage of the filtration process, which included coagulation, filtration, and delivery

The late Robert Brooks Morse (1880-1936) was married to Carrie Emma Ross-Morse (1883-1979). They had two children: Caroline Allen Morse (1903-1905) and Katherine B. Morse-Devereaux (1904-1984)

  • He was trained as a civil engineer at Johns Hopkins University (A.B. 1901) and at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (S.B. 1904).  He became Chief engineer at WSSC since its inception in 1918
  • Unfortunately, he died prematurely at age 55 due to blood poisoning, months before the water filtration plant opened.  WSSC named the water filtration plant in his honor

The water filtration plant did not have the capacity to meet rising service demands from suburban growth and it was closed in 1962. The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission acquired the former water plant in 2000.  Today they are recreational facilities known as Burnt Mills West Special Park (the high-lift pumping station) and Burnt Mills East Special Park (the low-lift pumping station)

There are no haunting legends associated with historical Burnt Mills nor the Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Facility. However, there may be potential for transcommunication experiences owing to area history.  The ghost expedition will focus on “drop-in” communication,

and not on evidence for a haunting

The ghost expedition will also participate in National Ghost Hunting Day (NGHD), an event sponsored by Haunted Journeys magazine.  Connectivity and live streaming will be provided by SHINDIG. Digital marketing services for the event are being provided by CyberSpyder. The event will attempt to build a global “consciousness bridge” that will last two hours

Data from random event generators (REGs) belonging to the Global Consciousness Project  (GCP) that are in proximity to participant locations will be monitored over the event. 

REFERENCES:

Beall, J.R. (1931). The history and construction of the mill at Burnt Mills, Maryland. Initiation Thesis. Records of Phi Mu Fraternity, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries.  University of Maryland, College Park. Hosted at archive.org

Boyd, T.H.S. (1879). The history of Montgomery County, Maryland – From its earliest settlement in 1650 to 1879. Baltimore, W.K. Boyle and Son

Bushong, W. (1994, May). Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant. M33-22. Maryland-National Capital Park And Planning Commission. Maryland Historical Trust

Find A Grave, database and images. Memorial page for Robert Brooks Morse (13 Sep 1880–31 Jan 1936), Find A Grave Memorial no. 135832899, citing Chebeague Island Cemetery, Chebeague Island, Cumberland County, Maine, USA. Maintained by townsendburial (contributor 47629974)

Historic Preservation, Montgomery County, Maryland. (1996, Mar 6). Montgomery County Atlas (MCATLAS) Map Viewer: ROBERT B. MORSE COMPLEX (WSSC). Resource Number: 33/022-000A. Maryland-National Capital Park And Planning Commission. Montgomery County, Maryland

Kelly, C.L. (2012). Burnt Mills Hills. M33-29. Maryland-National Capital Park And Planning Commission. Maryland Historical Trust

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND HISTORICAL CHRONOLOGY. (2018). Maryland State Archives

Montgomery Parks. (2016, Aug 15). Burnt Mills West Special Park. Maryland-National Capital Park And Planning Commission

Montgomery County Planning Department. Montgomery County Atlas (MCATLAS) Map Viewer: Burnt Mills West Special Park. Montgomery County (MD). Department of Parks. Montgomery County, Maryland

National Ghost Hunting Day: The World’s Largest Ghost Hunt. (2018).  Haunted Journeys

Shannon, J.H. (1913, Jun 22). With the Rambler. Sunday Star, Washington DC.  Reprinted in Neighbors of the Northwest Branch

Shannon, J.H. (1916, May 14).  With the Rambler: Tramping the Northwest Branch. Sunday Star, Washington DC.  Reprinted in Neighbors of the Northwest Branch

Sutton, R. (2016, Jun 16). Burnt Mills Dam has a long history in Montgomery County. Ross Sutton Blog. Keller Williams Real Estate

Williams, B.J. (2017).  Exploring Collective Consciousness: Could There Be Some Implications for Paranity?. National Ghost Hunting Day Collective Consciousness Article. Psychical Research Foundation

IMAGES:

Historic American Engineering Record. (1968). REAR ELEVATION of high-lift pumping station. Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD.  Library of Congress

Historic American Engineering Record. (1968). FRONT ELEVATION of high-lift pumping station. Colesville Road (also called U.S.Route 29 or Columbia Pike) is in foreground. Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD.  Library of Congress

Burnt Mills Flour Mill prior to its demolition – Figure 1. (c 1928).  From Beall, J.R. (1931). The history and construction of the mill at Burnt Mills, Maryland. Initiation Thesis. Records of Phi Mu Fraternity, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries.  University of Maryland, College Park. 

Hosted at archive.org

Burnt Mills Flour Mill prior to its demolition – Figure 2. (c 1928).  From Beall, J.R. (1931). The history and construction of the mill at Burnt Mills, Maryland. Initiation Thesis. Records of Phi Mu Fraternity, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries.  University of Maryland, College Park. 

Hosted at archive.org

Historic American Engineering Record. (1968). GROUND FLOOR of high-lift pumping station. Note the main stairway and columns. Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD.  Library of Congress

Historic American Engineering Record. (1968). ATTIC of high-lift pumping station showing steel framing and concrete slab roof units. Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD.  Library of Congress

Historic American Engineering Record. (1968). OFFICE SPACE ON SECOND FLOOR of high-lift pumping station. Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD.  Library of Congress

Historic American Engineering Record. (1968). BASEMENT of high-lift pumping station. Note steel I-beam and pump foundations. Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD.  Library of Congress

National Ghost Hunting Day: The World’s Largest Ghost Hunt. (2017).  Haunted Journeys

Montgomery Parks. (2016, Aug 15). SOUTHEAST ELEVATION. Burnt Mills West Special Park. Maryland-National Capital Park And Planning Commission

Furnacetown Snow Hill MD Ghost Expedition 2018 /Worcester County…

Furnacetown Snow Hill MD Ghost Expedition 2018 /Worcester County (“Maryland”)

http://maryland-paranormal.com Direct Radio Voice (DRV) stream (“Maryland”) captured by Maryland Paranormal Research ® at Furnacetown Living Heritage Village [Snow Hill MD] Ghost Expedition Jul 28-29 2018. Several responses were heard in response to a (location) control question regarding the county and name of the state (“Maryland”).  There was also a reference to Worcester  County. Audio was captured with a SONY DCR SR45 Handycam with an onboard ZOOM condenser microphone.  The DRV stage consisted of a: P-SB7 ITC device; MACKIE 402-VLZ3 Mixer; HARMON DIGITECH 1066 Vocal Processor; ART EQ-351 31 Band 1/3 Octave Graphic Equalizer;  TIMEWAVE DSP-599zx Digital Noise Filter and a BOSE speaker.  Audio was analyzed with PRAAT software which provided the wave forms and voice print.  The audio was also enhanced with noise filtering and normalization using AUDACITY. [AUDIO ENHANCED][HEADPHONES RECOMMENDED]

Furnacetown Snow Hill MD Ghost Expedition 2018 /Worcester County…

Furnacetown Snow Hill MD Ghost Expedition 2018 /Worcester County (“Yes, Behind You”)

http://maryland-paranormal.com Direct Radio Voice (DRV) stream (“Yes, Behind You”) captured by Maryland Paranormal Research ® at Furnacetown Living Heritage Village [Snow Hill MD] Ghost Expedition Jul 28-29 2018. Several responses were heard in response to questions regarding the whereabouts of Sampson Harmon. One communicator indicates (“Yes, Behind You”).  Audio was captured with a SONY DCR SR45 Handycam with an onboard ZOOM condenser microphone.  The DRV stage consisted of a: P-SB7 ITC device; MACKIE 402-VLZ3 Mixer; HARMON DIGITECH 1066 Vocal Processor; ART EQ-351 31 Band 1/3 Octave Graphic Equalizer; TIMEWAVE DSP-599zx Digital Noise Filter and a BOSE speaker.  Audio was analyzed with PRAAT software which provided the wave forms and voice print.  The audio was also enhanced with noise filtering and normalization using AUDACITY. [AUDIO ENHANCED][HEADPHONES RECOMMENDED]

Furnacetown Snow Hill MD Ghost Expedition 2018 /Worcester County…

Furnacetown Snow Hill MD Ghost Expedition 2018 /Worcester County (“They is Wrong”)

http://maryland-paranormal.com Direct Radio Voice (DRV) stream (“They is Wrong”) captured by Maryland Paranormal Research ® at Furnacetown Living Heritage Village [Snow Hill MD] Ghost Expedition Jul 28-29 2018. Several responses, some errant, were heard in response to a question regarding presidencies and voting rights during the lifetime of late Sampson Harmon.  One communicator appears to exclaim (“They is Wrong”). Audio was captured with a SONY DCR SR45 Handycam with an onboard ZOOM condenser microphone.  The DRV stage consisted of a: P-SB7 ITC device; MACKIE 402-VLZ3 Mixer; HARMON DIGITECH 1066 Vocal Processor; ART EQ-351 31 Band 1/3 Octave Graphic Equalizer; TIMEWAVE DSP-599zx Digital Noise Filter and a BOSE speaker.  Audio was analyzed with PRAAT software which provided the wave forms and voice print.  The audio was also enhanced with noise filtering and normalization using AUDACITY. [AUDIO ENHANCED][HEADPHONES RECOMMENDED]

Furnacetown Snow Hill MD Ghost Expedition 2018 /Worcester County…

Furnacetown Snow Hill MD Ghost Expedition 2018 /Worcester County (“Caroline”)

http://maryland-paranormal.com Direct Radio Voice (DRV) stream (“Caroline”) captured by Maryland Paranormal Research ® at Furnacetown Living Heritage Village [Snow Hill MD] Ghost Expedition Jul 28-29 2018. Several responses were heard in response to a question regarding the names of the daughters of the late Sampson Harmon to include (“Caroline”).  There was also a reference possibly to Mary E Harmon. Audio was captured with a SONY DCR SR45 Handycam with an onboard ZOOM condenser microphone.  The DRV stage consisted of a: P-SB7 ITC device; MACKIE 402-VLZ3 Mixer; HARMON DIGITECH 1066 Vocal Processor; ART EQ-351 31 Band 1/3 Octave Graphic Equalizer; TIMEWAVE DSP-599zx Digital Noise Filter and a BOSE speaker.  Audio was analyzed with PRAAT software which provided the wave forms and voice print.  The audio was also enhanced with noise filtering and normalization using AUDACITY. [AUDIO ENHANCED][HEADPHONES RECOMMENDED]

Furnacetown Snow Hill MD Ghost Expedition 2018 /Worcester County…

Furnacetown Snow Hill MD Ghost Expedition 2018 /Worcester County (“I Know Her Family”)

http://maryland-paranormal.com Direct Radio Voice (DRV) stream (“I Know Her Family”) captured by Maryland Paranormal Research ® at Furnacetown Living Heritage Village [Snow Hill MD] Ghost Expedition Jul 28-29 2018. Several responses were heard in response to questions regarding the Purnell family. One communicator responds (“I Know Her Family”). Audio was captured with a SONY DCR SR45 Handycam with an onboard ZOOM condenser microphone.  The DRV stage consisted of a: P-SB7 ITC device; MACKIE 402-VLZ3 Mixer; HARMON DIGITECH 1066 Vocal Processor; ART EQ-351 31 Band 1/3 Octave Graphic Equalizer; TIMEWAVE DSP-599zx Digital Noise Filter and a BOSE speaker.  Audio was analyzed with PRAAT software which provided the wave forms and voice print.  The audio was also enhanced with noise filtering and normalization using AUDACITY. [AUDIO ENHANCED][HEADPHONES RECOMMENDED]

Ghost Expedition Jefferson County, Shepherdstown WV: Entler…

Ghost Expedition Jefferson County, Shepherdstown WV: Entler Hotel/Historic Shepherdstown

Shepherdstown is considered the “oldest city in West Virginia” with a history predating the French-Indian War.  

The town was chartered in 1762 by the royal Virginia governor as Mecklenberg, named for Charlotte of Mecklenberg-Strelitz, wife of King George III. The name of Charlottesville had already been granted to another town in the colony. Thomas Shepherd was named the trustee of the town of 222 acres which had been granted to him in 1734.  Eventually the town would be named for him in 1798

Shepherdstown is also known by the nickname of “The Old Unterrified” due to its contributions to the nation’s wars. Shepherdstown was said to have provided more soldiers in the American Revolutionary War than any other town of its size in Virginia. In response to General George Washington’s call for volunteers in 1775, the Mecklenberg company of 97 men commanded by Capt Hugh Stephenson made the famous “Beeline March“ from Morgan Spring to Cambridge Massachusetts, ranging 600 miles in 24 days

According to the Shepherdstown’s Register in 1850, the town ”sent nearly three complete companies to the field“ in the War of 1812 and contributed to ranks of several other companies.  Troops from Shepherdstown, led by Lieutenant Bennett Riley, repulsed the British attack at the Battle of Plattsburgh.  During the capture of Fort George, a Shepherdstown resident, Michael Durnhoeffer, leapt upon the wall of the fort amidst a barrage of artillery fire, and yelled out, “HURRAH FOR OLD SHEPHERDSTOWN”

During the Mexican War, Colonel John Francis Hamtramck led the 1st Virginia Volunteer Regiment.  He was mayor of Shepherdstown from 1850 to 1854, and from 1853 to 1858 served on the Jefferson County Court. He died at his home in Shepherdstown in 1858.  The Hamtramck Guard (The Shepherdstown Light Infantry) was sent to Harpers Ferry to quell John Brown’s raid on the federal armory in 1859.  In the Civil War, this group became Company B, 2nd Virginia Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia

Battles took place all around Shepherdstown throughout the Civil War due to its proximity to Pack Horse Ford, a crossing of the Potomac River.  After the Battle of Antietam in 1862, Shepherdstown became a giant makeshift hospital for thousands of confederate wounded  

A Confederate rear guard, led by General William Pendleton, repulsed Union attacks on forces withdrawing from Sharpsburg in the Battle of Shepherdstown.  The 118th Pennsylvania, known as the Philadelphia Corn Exchange Regiment, suffered heavy losses against battle-hardened confederates, amounting to 269 casualties from 737 men

The properties making up the Entler Hotel were built in 1786 by Philip Adam Entler Jr and expanded in 1790 by Daniel Bedinger. The hotel returned to Entler family ownership in 1824 and was managed for many years by Daniel Entler and his wife Margaret, and later by their oldest son son Jacob.  

The Entler Hotel was a societal hub for Shepherdstown. However, the hotel suffered losses from caring for confederate wounded in the Civil War. After a devastating fire in 1912 which destroyed much of downtown German street, Entler family heirs sold the property, which after renovations opened as the Rumsey Hotel

In 1921, the property was acquired by Shepherd University and renamed Rumsey Hall where it served as a student dormitory, faculty housing and later as storage.  In 1973 the hotel was added to the National Register of Historic Places.  In 1978, the city acquired the building and renovations were begun by Historic Shepherdstown in 1979.  The property reopened as Historic Shepherdstown and Museum in 1983

The Entler Hotel is thought to be haunted by the ghost of Peyton Bull Smith.  He was killed in a duel by his business partner Joseph Holmes on Tuesday, Nov 3, 1809 at daybreak. Smith was carried to the hotel where he died.  Noises, moans, and footsteps haunt the hotel.  Other folklore legends include a gambler shot himself after losing cattle money and the daughter of the hotel manager died in the 1910 fire within the hotel

Though less widely known, haunted activity in the form of imitative noises is also said to occur in the vicinity of the Schomaker & Co piano on the first floor.  The piano was originally owned by John Henry Schau and his wife Elizabeth Catherine Cookus-Schau (she was also called “Aunt Betsy”). The couple resided on German Street in Shepherdstown.

The paranormal television show Ghosts of Shepherdstown featured a series of haunted locations that were loosely clustered around the Town Run, a tributary of the Potomac river that runs through the center of the town

The ghost expedition sought “drop-in” communications in connection with the history and legacies of the Shepherdstown

REFERENCES:

Civil War Trust. An Interview with Nicholas Redding. American Battlefield Trust

Dandridge, D. (1910).  Historic Shepherdstown. The Michie Company Printers, Charlottesville, Virginia

Digital Exhibit: Schomacker & Co. Piano. (2016). Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

John Francis Hamtramck. (2018). Digital Exhibit. Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Langmyer, M. (2016). The Entler Hotel – Restoration. Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Langmyer, M. (2016).  Shepherdstown and the American Civil War.  Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Langmyer, M. (2016). The Battle of Shepherdstown.  Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Lehman, M.C. (2016). The Entler Hotel – History. Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

McGee, T. (1972, Oct 6). National Register of Historic Places Nomination: Rumsey Hall (Entler Hotel). National Park Service

McGee, T. (1973, Apr 2). National Register of Historic Places Nomination: Shepherdstown Historic District. National Park Service

Norris, D.A. (2018). Battle of Shepherdstown. American Battlefield Trust

Our Own Ghost of Shepherdstown. (2016). Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Price, J.C. and Woods, D.C (2016). The Entler Hotel – A Chronology. Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Rogers, J.E. (2013, Jan 13). Daniel Entler (b 1785 – d1866) and Family. Memorial ID 103540248. Find A Grave

Rumsey Hall (Shepherdstown, West Virginia). (2018, Apr 27). Wikipedia

Shepherdstown: Battle of Boteler’s Ford. (2018). American Battlefield Trust

Shepherdstown Gets Over Fire. (1912, Nov 16). The Daily News, Frederick, MD. Newspapers.com

SHEPHERDSTOWN, WV “SEMI-QUINCENTENNIAL” 250TH ANNIVERSARY AND CELEBRATION. (2012). Corporation of Shepherdstown WV

Shepherdstown, West Virginia. (2018). Wikipedia

Stoner-Reed, P. (1987, Sep 26), National Register of Historic Places Nomination: Shepherdstown Historic District (Boundary Increase). National Park Service

Thomas, J.B. (2018). War of 1812. Digital Exhibit. Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

IMAGES:

Acroterian. (2008, Nov 29). Entler Hotel (Rumsey Hall), Shepherdstown, West Virginia. Wikipedia

Highsmith, C. M., photographer. (2015). The historic Entler Hotel, now the city visitors’ center, in Shepherdstown, West Virginia. Shepherdstown United States West Virginia, 2015. -04-29.  Library of Congress

Rumsey Hall, looking north or front view. (c 1925). Rumsey Hall Gallery. Shepherd University

Rumsey Hall as the Entler Hotel, looking northwest up German Street. (c 1880). Rumsey Hall Gallery. Shepherd University

Shepherdstown during the Civil War.  Historic Shepherdstown archives. Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Waud, A.R. (1862, Oct 11). Sketch of the Philadephia Corn Exchange Regiment Fording the Potomac Near Shepherdstown. Harper’s Weekly. p. 652. 

Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Boteler’s Ford, Potomac River near Shepherdstown. Point at which Confederate Army crossed after battle of Antietam

(c 1861-1865).   Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Ruins of bridge, across Potomac River at Shepherdstown.  (c 1861-1865).  

Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Rumsey Hall as the Entler Hotel after the fire, looking west up German Street. (1912, Nov). Rumsey Hall Gallery. Shepherd University

The Entler Hotel when the Town bought in 1979. (1979). Historic Shepherdstown and Museum

Ghost Expedition Worcester County, Snow Hill Maryland:…

Ghost Expedition Worcester County, Snow Hill Maryland: Nassawango Furnace Archaeological Site/Furnace Town Living Heritage Village

According to the historian Mercedes Quesada-Embid, the story of Furnacetown and the Nassawango Iron Furnace in Snow Hill Maryland involves transitions through eras of colonial expansion, industrial boom and bust, abandonment followed by environmental renewal, conservation and historic preservation 

The wetlands, forests and coasts in the greater Nassawango Creek were initially settled by the Pokemoke and Assateague tribes. In the Pokemoke language, Nassawango means “the ground between the streams.”  The Nassawango Creek is the main tributary of the Pokemoke river which empties into the Chesapeake Bay

The initial contact with the native tribes was made by the Englishman, Captain John Smith in 1608.  Native villages were not concentrated nor permanent settlements; families and tribes relocated as seasons changed.  Small areas and passages were cleared for hunting and gathering, farming and protection

The initial exchanges between natives and settlers were cooperative during a short-lived fur trading industry.  As settlements expanded and colonial land uses turned toward tobacco farming, forest areas were cleared for agricultural use.  Deforestation and the rise of large-scale plantations altered the natural habitat  accelerating the disappearance of the native way of life, leading to conflicts over land  

Native tribes were relocated to a portion of the Nassawango near present day Snow Hill known as Askiminkonson, which in Algonquin means “stony place where they pick early berries.” The swampy lowland was considered not suitable for farming.  Native petitions to the English government were unsuccessful and the reservation dwindled.  By 1750 there there was no native presence

there

Nassawango creek entered an industrial era when a charter was granted to the Maryland Iron Company in 1829.  The company claimed 5000 acres of forest and swamp lands, which were rich in bog ore, as well as a gristmill, sawmill and millpond. A hot blast furnace was built by 1831. From oral histories, the company erected a

“furnace town”

with streets, company stores, a blacksmith, a dressmaker, hotel, post office and church

The company ran into financial troubles by 1832 and was fully acquired by a wealthy Philadelphia-based industrialist named Ben Jones by 1834.  In 1835, the operation was leased to a Thomas Spence, a young lawyer based in Snow Hill.  For a time the operation flourished and was producing 700 tons of pig iron annually. The furnace ran for 24 hours per day for 32 weeks out of the year.  Light from the orange flames produced by the furnace could be seen for miles

However, poor ore quality and declining market demand led to closure by 1850. Nearly all of Furnace Town’s residents departed leaving a ghost town. After the furnace closed, the property was used by successive owners for timber rights.  However, for the next 100 years, the land was untouched and ecological processes began to restore the wetlands, forests and habitats that had been cleared or polluted by slag by industrialization  

Land surrounding the old furnace was donated to the Worcester County Historical Society (WCHS)

in 1962. The Nature Conservancy (TNC) acquired adjoining lands from 1977 to 1981.  WCHS and TNC partnered to preserve area history and ecology and beginning in 1977 had moved several historic buildings to site to form the Furnace Town Living Heritage Museum.

The partnership formed the Furnace Town Foundation in 1982.   

The Pokemoke Forest has many folklore and legends to include the Hook-Man, Goat-Man, fireballs and lights, slave and swamp ghosts, and elemental creatures.  Furnace Town itself is said to haunted by the ghosts of several former area residents to include the late Sampson Harmon, the town’s last resident

Sampson Harmon was a free African-American born in Nassawango Hills. He was said to be a

“big, tall, fast, and strong man.”  He was the “go-to” worker at the iron furnace and worked very hard to provide for his family. Sampson always wore a hat and was fictionalized as “Sampson Hat” in George Alfred Townsend’s novel “The Entailed Hat”

 

When the iron furnace closed Sampson insisted on staying in Furnace Town. His dying wish was to have his ashes left at his homestead but this was not granted. His ghost is said to wander and guard the area

The ghost expedition will seek to obtain “drop-in” communications connected with the rich and storied history of the Nassawango

REFERENCES:

‘Folk Tale Trilogy’ Is Celebration Of Stories. (1988, Jul 6). The Daily Times (Salisbury MD).

Furnace Town Living Heritage Village. (2018). Nassawango Furnace Archaeological Site, Worcester County, Snow Hill MD. Furnace Town.

Kester-McCabe, D. Tales of Snow Hill. Delmarva Almanac.

LeVan, K., and Reiten A, (2006). The Snow Hill Historic District. Snow Hill Historic District Commission. Town of Snow Hill Maryland.

Lutz, L. (2005, Jun 1). Nassawango’s furnace – and forest – rising from the ruins. Bay Journal.

Miller, N. (1973, Apr). National Register of Historic Places Registration. Nassawango Iron Furnace Site. Maryland Historical Trust.

Quesada-Embid, M. (2004). Five Hundred Years on Five Thousand Acres: Human Attitudes and Land Use at Nassawango Creek, Native Americans of the Delmarva Peninsula. Edward H. Nab Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University Libraries, Maryland Shared Open Access Repository (SOAR).

Robbins, M.W. (1972). The Maryland Iron Industry. Manuscript prepared for the Maryland Bi-centennial Commission, Annapolis, Maryland.

Runkle, S. A. (2003, Sep). Native American Waterbody and Place Names within the Susquehanna River Basin and Surrounding Subbasins Publication 229. Susquehanna River Basin Commission.

Sampson Harmon: Furnace Town’s Resident Cat Collecting Ghost. (2012, Oct 30). ShoreBread.

Searching for history at Furnace Town. (1990, Aug 5). The Daily Times (Salisbury MD).

Teich, I. 14 Myths and Legends Surrounding Maryland’s Haunted Pocomoke Forest. Ranker.

Touart, P. (2009). Worcesters’s African American Heritage. Worcester County Tourism.

Worcester County, Maryland: Historical Chronology. Maryland State Archives.

IMAGES:

Bourne, M.O., photographer. (1969, Nov). Furnace Stack, looking southeast. Nassawango Furnace Archaeological Site, Worcester County, Snow Hill Maryland. Maryland Historical Trust.

Bourne, M.O., photographer.

(1969, Nov). Detail, hot air apparatus, looking northeast. Nassawango Furnace Archaeological Site, Worcester County, Snow Hill Maryland. Maryland Historical Trust.

DETAIL, ¾ VIEW OF HOT BLAST STOVE ON TOP OF FURNACE SHOWING CAST-IRON RETORTS AND TURNED HEAD (WHERE RAW MATERIALS WERE LOADED INTO FURNACE). Nassawango Iron Furnace, Furnace Road, 1.2 miles west of Maryland Route 12, Snow Hill, Worcester County, MD. Historic American Engineering Record, Library of Congress.

HAER MD,24-SNOHI.V,2- (sheet 6 of 12) – Nassawango Iron Furnace, Furnace Road, 1.2 miles west of Maryland Route 12, Snow Hill, Worcester County, MD. 

Historic American Engineering Record, Library of Congress.

Sculpture of Sampson Harmon. (2018). Furnace Town Living Heritage Village. Furnace Town Foundation.

Photograph of Sampson Harmon. (2009). In Worcesters’s African American Heritage. Worcester County Tourism. Courtesy of the Julia A Purnell Museum.

Robbins, M.W., photographer.

(1972). Furnace casting hearth, looking west. Nassawango Furnace Archaeological Site, Worcester County, Snow Hill Maryland. Maryland Historical Trust.

Nassawango Iron Furnace, looking southeast. (2018). Worcester County, Snow Hill Maryland. Furnace Town Living Heritage Village.

psychicmyst-blog-blog: These pics are enlarge…

psychicmyst-blog-blog:

These pics are enlarged here not by my doing but you can see them better on my PsychicMyst Facebook page. They were taking during an experiment portal ITC session.  

Regular

ultradarkohio:

The Haunting of The Rankin House

A HOUSE OF HOPE…

The Rankin House was built in the 1800s and is an important place in Ohio and US history.

Located in Ripley in Brown County, OH. The Rankin House was one of many stops on the underground rail road, a group of places in which runaway slaves were hidden on their way to freedom. 

As of now it is a historical site.

HAUNTINGS

The ghost of a dog has been spotted around the property and multiple voices have been heard around the house. 

The house has a lot of history, but does that mean it’s haunted? It’s a possibility.